BOLO Best Bets: First Friday takes flight, and buckle up for some big names in music

Find Esa Chabe's work on display this First Friday at Treehouse in Soquel.

Now, this is how you welcome in April. We are not April foolin’ when we say we have a big weekend ahead on the arts/entertainment front. First Friday will be cranking, especially over at the Tannery Arts Center, as Kate Hawley‘s new play opens at the Colligan. Burlesque at the Rio, an Indigenous cultural celebration at UC Santa Cruz, and huge names on the musical calendar from electronic/new wave (Gary Numan), country (Rodney Crowell) and jazz (Dianne Reeves). And Rebirth Brass Band arrives in town packing a little New Orleans sass. Wow, I’m tired already.

— Wallace Baine

Lookout Santa Cruz’s BOLO (Be On the Lookout) calendar is “your place to go for things to do” in Santa Cruz County.

See our full BOLO calendar listings for events in Santa Cruz here. And as if that isn’t enough, we have you covered for all the MAJOR events coming up into the next year with Down The Line, a listing assembled by Wallace Baine that’s your key to getting tickets before they sell out.

Now, here’s what Team BOLO thinks you should know for the weekend and beyond:

(Click category headers for full BOLO listings in that category.)

LIVE MUSIC

FRIDAY
Sarah Jarosz: Austin-born singer-songwriter Sarah Jarosz grew up as a musician in bluegrass, as part of the celebrated acoustic trio I’m With Her, the house band for Chris Thile’s popular radio show “Live From Here.” As a solo artist, Jarosz has spread her wings into more expansive sounds that won her a Grammy for Best Americana Album for her 2020 release “World on the Ground.” She landed another Grammy nomination for her most recent album, “Blue Heron Suite,” and is getting lots of attention for her beautiful reworking of U2’s “Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For.” Jarosz lands at Felton Music Hall on Friday.

FRIDAY
3.2 featuring Robert Berry: Fans of 1970s/80s progressive rock might be familiar with the work of bassist/vocalist Robert Berry, perhaps best known for his collaboration with ex-ELP prog-rockers Keith Emerson and Carl Palmer in a band called 3 (that band scored with the hit “Talkin’ Bout” back in 1988). Berry has also played with notable bands Ambrosia, Sammy Hagar and the Greg Kihn Band. He’s now touring with his latest band, 3.2, a four-piece group featuring Berry originals plus his reworkings of songs from prog-rock giants such as Genesis, Yes and Jethro Tull. 3.2, with Robert Berry, rolls into Michael’s on Main in Soquel for a show Friday. Things get started at 8 p.m.

SUNDAY
Gary Numan: There are some performers who were just born too early. Top of the list is the great Gary Numan, who was pioneering synth-pop electronica way back in the genre’s Stone Age. Known the world over for his unforgettable 1979 mega-hit “Cars,” the British-born Numan first emerged leading his punk-ish band Tubeway Army. He was a presence on the British music scene for decades, but, at 64, he’s still making challenging and relevant music including 2017’s “Savage (Songs from a Broken World)” and his latest, “Intruder,” featuring a darkly textured sound heavy on cold, at-times sinister synthesizers, and songs mulling apocalyptic themes. One of pop music’s great underappreciated pioneers comes to the Catalyst in Santa Cruz on Sunday. Showtime is 8 p.m.

SUNDAY
Rodney Crowell: There are few artists more deeply rooted in American country music, from both the Texas and Nashville sides of it, than singer-songwriter Rodney Crowell. The onetime son-in-law of Johnny Cash first made his name as a songwriter, and he’s penned a long string of hits for such artists as Waylon Jennings, Emmylou Harris, Etta James, the Grateful Dead and his sainted father-in-law, among many others. A masterful musician, he was a sideman in Emmylou’s Angel Band for years. But he’s also a towering figure as a performer and recording artist in his own right, always finding a balance that hits the sweet spot between roots and mainstream country. Crowell is now on tour supporting his fine new album, “Triage,” a deeply personal meditation on mortality and the precious nature of life. He’s also arriving at the Rio in Santa Cruz on Sunday.

SUNDAY
Rebirth Brass Band: Wanna learn more about the uniquely blues-flavored jazz of New Orleans? Jump into the deep end with the Rebirth Brass Band, one of the landmark purveyors of New Orleans roots brass-band tradition. Rebirth is steeped in the style of second-line brass, but it adds heaping helpings of funk, soul, jazz and even hip-hop. If you caught the moving HBO docudrama “Treme,” you’re already ahead of the game. These guys were all over that series. Rebirth imports that one-of-a-kind “Nahr Leens” spirit Sunday with a show at Moe’s Alley in Santa Cruz.

TUESDAY
Dianne Reeves: At the very heart of contemporary vocal jazz is the queenly Dianne Reeves, whose five Grammys are only scratching the surface of her reputation among fans and critics alike. In 2018, she was named a Jazz Master by the National Endowment of the Arts. Firmly in the lineage of jazz titan Dinah Washington, Reeves has performed with many of the giants of jazz including Stanley Turrentine, Herbie Hancock and countless others. She performs two shows in the intimate setting of the Kuumbwa Jazz Center on Tuesday.

— Wallace Baine

FESTIVALS

A poster for IndigeFest 2022

SATURDAY
IndigeFest 2022 — Celebrating Indigenous Cultures of the Americas: Head to the Upper Quarry Amphitheater at UC Santa Cruz on Saturday to join a celebration of the Americas’ Indigenous cultures, inspired by and dedicated to Sophia Garcia Robles, who worked at UCSC for 27 years. Performances, music, food and other activities will all be happening, along with the chance to learn about the presence of Indigenous communities on campus, in the city and more.

SUNDAY
Ukrainian cultural fundraiser at Hallcrest Vineyards: Discover traditional Ukrainian folk dancing, music, food, storytelling and art, plus giveaways and more, at Hallcrest Vineyards’ Felton tasting room. The family-owned business will donate 50% of all wine and cider sales during the event towards humanitarian efforts in Ukraine.

RELATED: How you can help support Ukraine from here in Santa Cruz

— Max Chun and Lucille Tepperman

THEATER

Santa Cruz playwright Kate Hawley
The Jewel Theatre Company is producing the world premiere of Santa Cruz playwright Kate Hawley’s “Remains To Be Seen.”
(Kevin Painchaud / Lookout Santa Cruz)

OPENING FRIDAY
“Remains To Be Seen”: Jewel Theatre in Santa Cruz continues its 2021-22 season with a world premiere of a new play from Santa Cruz playwright Kate Hawley. “Remains to Be Seen” is a comedy/drama about a group of college friends who have been reuniting regularly every five years for decades, and what happens when some of them begin to wonder why they continue to meet. Directed by longtime Santa Cruz Shakespeare director Paul Mullins and starring familiar local actors Mike Ryan and Paul Whitworth, among others, “Remains” promises a few revelations and even some surprises. The production has the second of two preview performances Thursday, then opens officially Friday at the Colligan Theater at the Tannery Arts Center, running through April 24.

SATURDAY
Best Coast Burlesque: It’s being billed as an evening of “love and heartbreak,” but it’s a safe bet that there will probably be other warm passions at play in this stage show from Best Coast Burlesque. The host of the event is a performer named Alotta Boutté, who’ll be joined on stage by her colleagues Truvy Trollop, Shiza Minnelli, Rouge Baby Ginsburg, Balla Fire, Babraham Lincoln and more, including headliner Jessabelle Thunder. (Consumer alert: These might not be these folks’ real names.) The show is being called “Bawdy of Venus,” so you might want to resist bringing your grandmother, or your grandchild. It all goes down at the Rio Theatre in Santa Cruz Saturday night. The temperature gets raised at 8 p.m.

— Wallace Baine

FILM

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FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Del Mar Theatre Midnight Movie – “Blade Runner: The Final Cut”: Ridley Scott’s sci-fi thriller “Blade Runner” is this weekend’s midnight movie at the Del Mar Theatre downtown. Part detective noir and part dystopian sci-fi experience, viewers will be treated to the 2007 final cut, featuring extended scenes and a beautiful 4K restoration. You might have seen Denis Villeneuve’s 2017 franchise reboot, but now you have the chance to relive the original — or see it for the first time on the big screen.

— Max Chun

FOOD & DRINK

A flyer for Soif Wine Bar's Chicken Sandwiches and Bubbles event

THURSDAY
Chicken Sandwiches and Bubbles: Soif Wine Bar presents a pop-up fried-chicken event with Chubbs Chicken Sandwiches. Chubbs’ sauce is unforgettable, and this is your chance to discover it with fried chicken and special sparkling wine pairings.

FRIDAY THROUGH SUNDAY
Big Basin Vineyards tasting room preview event: Discover the new tasting room and wine bar on lower Pacific Avenue in downtown Santa Cruz at a preview opening event showcasing the evolution of Big Basin Vineyards’ wines. There will be carefully selected wine pairings with a sampling of the menu created from BBV’s culinary collaboration with local chefs, makers and growers of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Tickets are limited for this event, happening Friday night and Saturday and Sunday afternoons.

SATURDAY
Cousins Maine Lobster Pop-Up: Stockwell Cellars’ Westside tasting room hosts a casual yet sophisticated dining event, with a pop-up food truck serving wild-caught and sustainably harvested Maine lobster to accompany your wine tasting. And for the ambiance, award-winning alto saxophonist and local musician Dave D’oh, aka Dave Muldawer, will be playing and singing from a repertoire that spans from the 1960s to the 2000s.

— Lucille Tepperman

VISUAL ARTS

Karen Potter's "Smoke: 2020 CZU lightning fires"
Karen Potter’s “Smoke: 2020 CZU lightning fires” is one of the member pieces on display at the Santa Cruz Art League through Sunday.

FINAL WEEKEND
SCAL Members A-Z Exhibition: The Santa Cruz Art League is celebrating its members with a big show featuring more than 100 artworks in a wide variety of mediums. The show at the SCAL Gallery — 526 Broadway, Santa Cruz — holds a closing celebration on Friday at the gallery from 6 to 8 p.m. The show runs through Sunday.

FRIDAY
Bryan Agrabrite & AguaMayyim: First Friday in Santa Cruz manifests in many different ways, one of them this unusual one-night-only event featuring the Burning Man-style kinetic sculptures of artist Bryan Agrabite and artists Franky Helix and Rose Dayal, operating under the name AguaMayyim, hosting an ecstatic dance program they’re calling a “silent disco” (the “silent” part is that you’ll be dancing with headsets). It all happens on the outdoor space at the Tannery Arts Center on a “nice, cushiony” dance floor Friday, beginning at 5 p.m.

FRIDAY
Amanda Hess & Bree Karpavage: Collage artist Bree Karpavage and painter/mixed media artist Amanda Prairiewind Hess will be the featured artists at big First Friday celebration in the grand opening of a new studio, Studio 105 at the Tannery Arts Center. Also featured will be the art of henna artist Evelyn Salguero and electroforming artist Janina Church, with live music provided by singer-songwriter Lindsey Wall. All from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday at the Tannery.

FRIDAY
Eggs for Ukraine: The Santa Cruz activist group Artists Respond & Resist Together will host an event highlighting the Ukrainian art of egg decorating. Dozens of eggs decorated in the style of pysanky will be on display at Curated By the Sea on Front Street in Santa Cruz, all for sale to raise money to bring meals to families in Ukraine through the charity World Central Kitchen. The event takes place Friday at Curated, from 6 to 8 p.m.

OPENING FRIDAY
“Spring Into Art”: Young artists from around the San Lorenzo Valley showcase their finest art on the theme of spring in a show opening Friday and running through the month of April. This family-friendly exhibit opens with a First Friday celebration including many fun activities from face-painting to photo booths, all at the Santa Cruz Mountains Art Center, 9341 Mill St., Ben Lomond. Friday’s event runs from 4 to 7 p.m.

OPENING FRIDAY
“Rituals of Spring”: Apricity Gallery at the Tannery Arts Center is the site for a one-month show from artists Dana Peters and Leigh Erickson, late of the Art Cave Gallery. Peters and Erickson surrendered their gallery space in 2020, but have been creating work focused on rebirth, which they will unveil at the Apricity. First Friday celebration takes place Friday from 5 to 9 p.m. The full show runs through April 30.

OPENING FRIDAY
“Pray for Rain”: Artist and printmaker Margaret Niven taps into what’s on everyone’s mind with her new show of haunting and mesmerizing natural imagery titled “Pray for Rain.” A First Friday event features printmaking demonstrations at the Printmakers at the Tannery gallery, reception from 6 to 9 p.m. with demonstrations happening at 7 p.m. The show runs through April 30.

OPENING SATURDAY
“The Art of Nature”: The Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History is ready to unleash “The Art of Nature,” its showcase of art from 30 local artists designed to illuminate the aesthetic of the natural world. The show opens with a Friday reception for museum members, then opens to the general public Saturday with both online and in-person experiences. The exhibit will feature many hands-on features and the show, running through June 5, will include a few special events including a makers market and workshops on illustrating nature. 1305 E. Cliff Dr.; just look for the big whale.

OPENING NEXT WEEK
“Alma Sagrada: Cultivando Ritmos Naturales”: The Pajaro Vallery Arts gallery in Watsonville is the site of an ambitious new exhibit, slated to open Wednesday, titled “Alma Sagrada (Sacred Soul).” Featured artists Abi Mustapha, Jose Ortiz, Hermelinda Vasquez and Natalia Anciso join with several other artists to explore the theme of Indigenous stewardship of natural systems in partnership with the Amah Mutsun Tribal Band. Many supporting events are planned through the month of April, including an opening reception April 10. The exhibition runs through May 22.

ONGOING
“This Is Now”: Talk about ambitious: Three local art galleries have combined forces for one group show. More than 150 artists from the Visual Arts Network are represented at the Radius Gallery at the Tannery, the R. Blitzer Gallery on the West Side, and Curated by the Sea downtown. Here’s how it works: The galleries are dividing the works based on the last name of the artists. The Radius features the works of artists from A to F. The Blitzer goes from G to O, and Curated takes on P to Z. “This Is Now” will be focused on new art, created in the past two years. First Friday events are planned at each gallery, the Blitzer from 4-7 p.m., Curated 6-8 p.m. and Radius 6-9 p.m. Go see them in alphabetical order, or be a rebel and see them in some other order. The shows all close April 9.

ONGOING
“Who We Are: Portraying Identity”: Cabrillo College presents its first in-person art show of the year at the Cabrillo Gallery on campus. The show gathers together a collection of artists of different disciplines to meditate on the question of identity, on the basis of ethnicity, culture, spirituality, politics, geography and several other categories. The show features 30 artworks that approach the question in different ways, and runs through April 8.

ONGOING
“Atmosphere”: Monterey Bay artist Enid Baxter Ryce taps into the familiar winter weather patterns for anyone who lives in Northern California in her interactive, multimedia exhibit, “Atmosphere,” at the Museum of Art & History in downtown Santa Cruz. Using paintings, photographs, film and even an interactive soundscape sculpture, Ryce brings together collaborators musician Lanier Sammons, historian William Cowan, sculptor Natalie Jenkins and scientist Dan Fernandez to example phenomena such as “atmospheric rivers” and winter fog. (There is a “fog collector” on hand as well.) The exhibit runs through the winter/early spring months, until May.

— Wallace Baine

BOOKS & LECTURES

Emerson Murray
(Kevin Painchaud / Lookout Santa Cruz)

THURSDAY
Emerson Murray: Santa Cruz author Emerson Murray has written the definitive oral history of the darkest period in the city’s history, the early 1970s when three separate unrelated serial killers haunted and terrorized Santa Cruz County. Murray’s “Murder Capital of the World” chronicles those terrible times with interviews of surviving family members, cops, lawyers, journalists and even the killers themselves. He takes part in a virtual event sponsored by Bookshop Santa Cruz to talk about his experience putting the story together and looking into the heart of deeply troubling times. It all happens via Zoom on Thursday. Things get started at 6 p.m.

THURSDAY, APRIL 7
Reyna Grande: Mexican American novelist/memoirist Reyna Grande counts Santa Cruz as one of her formative influences. As an undergrad at UC Santa Cruz, Grande sparked an original writer’s voice that blossomed with her first novel, “Across a Hundred Mountains” and later with her acclaimed memoir of crossing the U.S.-Mexico border as a child, “The Distance Between Us,” which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. On April 7, Grande visits her alma mater with a book event at the Cowell Ranch Hay Barn on campus. Co-presented by the Humanities Institute and Research Center for the Americas at UCSC, as well as Bookshop Santa Cruz, the event is to celebrate the release of Grande’s new novel, a historical epic from the U.S.-Mexican War of the 1840s titled “A Ballad of Love and Glory.” This ticketed event features Grande in conversation with UCSC’s Micah Perks and Sylvanna Falcon. It all starts at 7 p.m.

— Wallace Baine

COMEDY

FRIDAY
Greater Purpose Comedy with headliner Luke Severeid: Luke Severeid brings his rambunctious, somewhat absurd comedy to Greater Purpose’s weekly showcase, energetically tackling some everyday, tough subjects with audacity and finesse. Happy hour prices on drinks when you get anything from Funk’s Franks food truck on site, and two ping-pong tables are up for grabs.

SATURDAY
11th Hour Comedy Hour starring Ryan Goodcase: If awkward, smart, and dry speaks to you, Ryan Goodcase headlining 11th Hour Coffee’s monthly Saturday showcase could be the excuse you need to visit the downtown space (an experience in itself). Goodcase is the youngest comic to have won the World Series of Comedy, and admission is free with a bite from Chubbs Chicken or drink from the full bar, both on site.

— Lucille Tepperman

KIDS & FAMILY

A promotional flyer for the April 3, 2022, Westside Marketplace

SUNDAY
Westside Marketplace: It’s the first Sunday of April, which means the Westside Marketplace is up and at it again. Find the usual selection of local art, handmade crafts and plenty of food trucks and pop-ups, with live music to boot. Great for locals and visitors of all ages — get your dose of local shopping with this monthly outdoor market.

— Max Chun

HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF BOLO

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